5-ways-technology-is-changing-health-care

Digital Health Services Rise in Popularity, Provide Value and Convenience

As healthcare’s “unsustainable costs” continue to pose challenges1, it’s easy to understand why your clients would be looking for ways to not only cut their costs but also enhance the value they receive. Digital health services such as telemedicine are packaging value, convenience, and competitive pricing so well that it is becoming “part of [consumers] normal process in terms of getting healthcare”2.

Talk to your clients about what telemedicine offers.

Today’s technological advancements in health and medicine have transformed the way the health professionals are able to help people all over the globe. With the help of phone, video, and wireless capabilities, your clients can take advantage of 24/7/365 access from home, work, or their travels to highly qualified doctors to discuss a myriad of health concerns.

Consider these significant contributions of the tool3:

  • Approximately more than 70% of urgent illness conditions can be taken care of with the help of telemedicine such as pharyngitis, sinusitis and upper respiratory illnesses.
  • It eliminates any chances of transmitting infectious diseases from a patient to the health care professional.
  • It allows health professionals to cater to the needs of the patients from any place at any given time.
Talk to your clients about the benefits of telemedicine.
  1. Lower costs: A recent study found that use of telemedicine can reduce costs for your clients as well as the hospital system4.
  2. Increased patient satisfaction: Hospitals are keenly aware how patient satisfaction is tied to federal reimbursement benchmarks that assess the quality of the care they provide. In a recent study, 98% of respondents who received care via telemedicine noted they would be interested in similar visits in the future and 99% would recommend telemedicine to others4.
  3. Increased access: Telemedicine isnt the new innovation on the block; it’s been providing access to healthcare to remotely-located patients for over 40 years5. The National Telehealth Policy Resource Center reports that it increases access6 to remotely located patients who need clinical services as well as remotely located hospitals, allowing them to provide emergency and intensive care services.
Talk to your clients about the future of telemedicine.

A quick search of recent headlines on telemedicine proves that the service is only just beginning to see its full potential. From diagnosing widespread flu2 to coordinating the ability to perform telestenting via robotic technologyto expanding access of health services to patients in rural areas8, the power of telemedicine is set to continue to revolutionize how and where healthcare meets patients in need of care.

Learn more about offering products with telemedicine benefits to your clients by:

 

Health Insurance Innovations, Inc. is a leading developer and administrator of affordable, web-based individual health insurance plans and ancillary products. We help consumers address their health insurance needs by offering access to a number of products offered by various insurance carriers.

For agent use only – not for use with the public

Sources:

1: “Editorial: Rising Healthcare Costs a Cancer, Not a Tapeworm.” Merrill Goozner. ModernHealthcare.comhttp://www.modernhealthcare.com/article/20180131/NEWS/180139978

2: “In-Depth: Surging Flu in a Proving Ground for Digital Health, Telemedicine.” Dave Muoio. MobiHealthNews.comhttp://www.mobihealthnews.com/content/depth-surging-flu-proving-ground-digital-health-telemedicine

3: “The Importance and Value of Telemedicine.” Karandeep Virdi. ElectronicHealthReporter.comhttp://electronichealthreporter.com/importance-value-telemedicine/

4: “Telemedicine Can Lower Costs for Health Systems by $24 a Patient, Study Finds.” Jeff Lagasse. HealthcareFinance.comhttp://www.healthcarefinancenews.com/news/telemedicine-can-lower-costs-health-systems-24-patient-study-finds

5: “Telemedicine poised for exponential growth.” Robert Ryan. BizJournals.com http://www.bizjournals.com/seattle/news/2016/09/27/telemedicine-poised-for-exponential-growth.html

6: California Telehealth Resource Center. “Why are Telemedicine and Telehealth so Important in Our Healthcare System?” http://www.caltrc.org/telehealth/why-are-telemedicine-and-telehealth-so-important-in-our-healthcare-system/

7: “Mayo Clinic to Explore the Use of Telemedicine for Stent Surgeries.” Etic Wicklund. mHealthIntelligence.com https://mhealthintelligence.com/news/mayo-clinic-to-explore-the-use-of-telemedicine-for-stent-surgeries

8: “Health IT Infrastructure Supports Successful Telemedicine Programs.” Elizabeth O’Dowd. HITInfrastructure.comhttps://hitinfrastructure.com/news/health-it-infrastructure-supports-successful-telemedicine-programs

Walk Your Clients into Improved Health for National Women’s Health Week

Each year during National Women’s Health Week, millions of women take steps to improve their health. The 19th annual National Women’s Health Week kicks off on May 13 and serves as a reminder for women to make our health a priority and to build positive health habits for life.

During your consultations with clients this week, remind them of this health observance and provide them with information and resources they need to get them on a journey toward better and long-lasting health.

Here’s how your office can participate in the 19th annual National Women’s Health Week:
  • Share the following tips with you clients
  • Take the National Women’s Health Week quiz to test your knowledge about healthy living
  • Show your fellow agents that you’re making women’s health a priority with these social media resources and use the #NWHW hashtag
  • Participate online or organize activities within office
The journey to create improved health habits can include:
 For every decade, it’s important for your clients to:

*Make sure your clients know how their health coverage works when it comes to well-woman visits. This preventive visit is essential to women’s health, as it’s a time for them to check in on how they’re doing, how they’d like to be doing, and what changes they can make to reach their health goals.

For Clients in Their 20s

 A client in this decade should ask her doctor at least once a year about:

  •  Whether she plans to have children in the next year or the right birth control
  • Her weight, diet, and physical activity level
  • Her tobacco and alcohol use
  • Any violence in her life
  • Depression and any other mental health concerns
  • Her family health history, especially of heart disease and cancer (these are the top two fatal diseases for women in the United States and are often linked to diet and lifestyle choices)
  • Protecting herself from the sun and the hazards of tanning

She should also ask if she needs these tests, medicines, or vaccines:

  • Blood pressure
  • Chickenpox
  • Cholesterol
  • Flu
  • Hepatitis B and C
  • HIV
  • HPV vaccine (26 and younger*)
  • Measles, mumps, and rubella
  • Pap (21 and older*)
  • Sexually transmitted infections (including chlamydia and gonorrhea tests for women 24 and younger*)
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, or whooping cough
  • Tuberculosis

If she is pregnant, prenatal care can also be a well-woman visit. There are also certain tests during pregnancy to check her and her baby’s health. Click here to learn more.

* Suggested by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations and may not apply to every person

For Clients in Their 30s

A client in this decade should ask her doctor at least once a year about:

  •  Whether she plans to have children in the next year or the right birth control
  • Her weight, diet, and physical activity level
  • Her tobacco and alcohol use
  • Any violence in her life
  • Depression and any other mental health concerns
  • Her family health history, especially of heart disease and cancer (these are the top two fatal diseases for women in the United States and are often linked to diet and lifestyle choices)

She should also ask if she needs these tests, medicines, or vaccines:

  • Blood pressure
  • Chickenpox
  • Cholesterol
  • Flu
  • Hepatitis B and C
  • HIV
  • Measles, mumps, and rubella
  • Pap and HPV
  • Sexually transmitted infections
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, or whooping cough
  • Tuberculosis

If she is pregnant, prenatal care can also be a well-woman visit. There are also certain tests during pregnancy to check her and her baby’s health. Click here to learn more.

For Clients in Their 40s

A client in this decade should ask her doctor at least once a year about:

  •  Whether she plans to have children in the next year or the right birth control (for premenopausal women)
  • Perimenopause symptoms
  • Her weight, diet, and physical activity level
  • Her tobacco and alcohol use
  • Any violence in her life
  • Depression and any other mental health concerns
  • Her family health history, especially of heart disease and cancer (these are the top two fatal diseases for women in the United States and are often linked to diet and lifestyle choices)

She should also ask if she needs these tests, medicines, or vaccines:

  • Blood pressure
  • Chickenpox
  • Cholesterol
  • Diabetes
  • Flu
  • Hepatitis B and C
  • HIV
  • Mammogram
  • Measles, mumps, and rubella
  • Pap and HPV
  • Sexually transmitted infections
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, or whooping cough
  • Tuberculosis

If she is pregnant, prenatal care can also be a well-woman visit. There are also certain tests during pregnancy to check her and her baby’s health. Click here to learn more.

For Clients in Their 50s

A client in this decade should ask her doctor at least once a year about:

  • Menopause symptoms
  • Your weight, diet, and physical activity level
  • Your tobacco and alcohol use
  • Any violence in your life
  • Depression and any other mental health concerns
  • Your family health history, especially of heart disease and cancer (these are the top two fatal diseases for women in the United States and are often linked to diet and lifestyle choices)

She should also ask if she needs these tests, medicines, or vaccines:

  • Low-dose aspirin
  • Blood pressure
  • Chickenpox
  • Cholesterol
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Diabetes
  • Flu
  • Hepatitis B and C
  • HIV
  • Lung cancer (55 and older*)
  • Mammogram
  • Measles, mumps, and rubella
  • Pap and HPV
  • Sexually transmitted infections
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, or whooping cough
  • Tuberculosis

* Suggested by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations and may not apply to every person

As you work with your clients to determine which type of coverage will help them tackle these health concerns and meet their budget and lifestyle needs, it’s crucial to review the basics with them.

If health benefit insurance is an option for them, discuss features such as:

  • Helpful for those anticipating rising medical expenses, unable to afford major medical, not eligible for short-term medical, and/or looking for supplemental coverage to their major medical plans
  • Guaranteed issue coverage if eligibility is met and available in state
  • Premiums often lower than major medical, but also lower and more restricted benefits
  • Benefits such as $50-$100 paid toward doctor and specialist visits available
  • Not required to use a network of doctors – freedom to choose any doctor or facility (*Note: clients can still exceed eligible benefits)
  • Preventive care available for as low as $50
  • Next day coverage available or little to no waiting periods for accidental injuries or sickness
  • 12 month waiting period for pre-existing conditions
  • Does not count as minimum essential coverage required by the Affordable Care Act and is not suitable to serve as sole medical coverage

If short-term medical is an option for them, discuss features such as:

  • Helpful for those facing life-altering transition periods such as pre-Medicare retirement, change in employment status, rolling off parental or student insurance, bridging a gap in major medical coverage or those who missed Open Enrollment (*Note: these policies are designed solely to provide healthcare coverage during unexpected coverage gaps)
  • Flexibility in coverage length and cost; coverage duration varies by state and is non-renewable
  • Variety of deductible and coinsurance options
  • Low copay options for in-network benefits
  • Limited preventive care available
  • Ability to cancel at any time without penalty
  • Benefits may be limited and subject to exclusions and restrictions
  • Does not cover pre-existing conditions
  • Coverage is not guaranteed
  • Not intended to be a replacement or alternative to ACA or other major medical plans and does not provide the minimum essential health benefits that are required; may result in a tax penalty

Disclaimer: Health benefit insurance and short-term medical coverage are not intended to be a replacement or alternative to ACA or other major medical plans nor does it provide the minimum essential health benefits that are required and it won’t help to avoid the fee for not carrying health insurance. They can have exclusions and limitations, which may not make them a valid option for some clients.

Show your clients that women’s health is a priority to you this week and every week. Provide them with affordable and quality coverage options that allow them to easily get the healthcare they need for every decade.

Learn more today by:

Click here to like us on Facebook for important industry updates, tips, and articles!

This blog is for informational purposes only and is not intended to make any product recommendations. Encourage your clients to review any product details, such as costs, limitations, exclusions, restrictions, and benefits prior to any purchasing decisions.

Health Insurance Innovations, Inc. is a leading developer and administrator of affordable, web-based individual health insurance plans and ancillary products. We help consumers address their health insurance needs by offering access to a number of products offered by various insurance carriers.

Many thanks to the Office of Women’s Health for this information and their work on behalf of women.

For more information on National Women’s Health Week as well as resources on a variety of trending topics in women’s health, wellness, and medical conditions, please click here.

 

For agent use only – not for use with the general public

 

 

#MoveInMay: Get Your Clients Moving for National Physical Fitness and Sports Month

It’s that time of year again – it’s time to #MoveInMay!

May is National Physical Fitness and Sports Month, a month dedicated to raising awareness about the benefits of physical activity and asking communities, health professionals, and families to work together to create opportunities for everyone to get more of it.

When talking to clients this month, ask them to keep their physical fitness goals in mind as they consider which coverage options best address their lifestyle and health needs.

Consider these stats from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1:
  • About 1 in 5 (21%) adults meet the current physical activity guidelines.
  • Less than 3 in 10 high school students get at least 60 minutes of physical activity every day.
  • Physical activity can improve health. People who are physically active tend to live longer and have lower risk for heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, depression, and some cancers.
  • Inactive adults have a higher risk for early death, heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, depression, and some cancers.

Your clients’ ages will determine the CDC recommended amount and type of activity for optimum health benefits. Share the link above in the first stat with your clients so they can learn more.

While many coverage options provide a wealth of insurance benefits to help your clients maintain their health, some plans may also provide additional programs and features that pique the interest of those looking to increase their physical activity:

 Access to digital fitness tools

Consistent physical activity is a core principle of good health. With tools to help them track their fitness journey, your clients can integrate personalized health and fitness guidance, including tips on nutrition and self-assessments, into workout routines. These tools can be included in short-term medical or health benefit insurance coverage.

24/7/365 access to board-certified doctors

Increasing physical activity can have a significant impact on general health, but your clients may still suffer from common illnesses, allergies, or infections from time to time. Short-term medical and health benefit insurance coverage can include benefits that allow them to connect with doctors in mere minutes via mobile and video to address health concerns quickly and conveniently.

Patient advocacy service

As your clients continue to increase their physical activity and fitness levels and make the most of their health coverage, they may need assistance navigating the world of healthcare. As is found with many traditional health insurance plans, short-term medical and health benefit insurance coverage can also include access to a patient advocacy service that can help them schedule appointments, find quality doctors and facilities, lower out-of-pocket costs, and make informed decisions about healthcare.

Remember that short-term and health benefit insurance coverage are not intended to replace ACA or major medical plans. These types of coverages do not provide the minimum essential health benefits that are required and will not help to avoid the fee for not carrying health insurance. They have limitations, restrictions, and exclusions that your clients must understand prior to making a purchasing decision.

Are you ready to get your clients to #MoveInMay with quality coverage that addresses their concerns?

Learn more today by:

Health Insurance Innovations, Inc. is a leading developer and administrator of affordable, web-based individual health insurance plans and ancillary products. We help consumers address their health insurance needs by offering access to a number of products offered by various insurance carriers.

For agent use only – not for use with the general public

Source: “Facts About Physical Activity.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/data/facts.htm